Missed Roundtable? Here’s What Happened! (2/6)

Follow+roundtable+on+instagram%3A+%40ghhsroundtable%0AFollow+roundtable+on+twitter%3A+%40ghroundtable%0AGet+text+reminders%3A+text+%40rndtable+to+81010+%3A%29
Back to Article
Back to Article

Missed Roundtable? Here’s What Happened! (2/6)

Follow roundtable on instagram: @ghhsroundtable
Follow roundtable on twitter: @ghroundtable
Get text reminders: text @rndtable to 81010 :)

Follow roundtable on instagram: @ghhsroundtable Follow roundtable on twitter: @ghroundtable Get text reminders: text @rndtable to 81010 :)

Kobe Davis

Follow roundtable on instagram: @ghhsroundtable Follow roundtable on twitter: @ghroundtable Get text reminders: text @rndtable to 81010 :)

Kobe Davis

Kobe Davis

Follow roundtable on instagram: @ghhsroundtable Follow roundtable on twitter: @ghroundtable Get text reminders: text @rndtable to 81010 :)

Ideliya Khismatova, Student Life Editor

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






On Wednesday, February 6th, the school’s Roundtable discussed with students how race affects their life and asked when race first became real to them.

During the first half, students shared their experiences about when they first became aware of race. One student described how his parents began talking to him at an early age. Another student talked about her experiences of recently moving from another country, and she explained how when she moved, she became friends with people from her own country much faster than those from other cultures because she had more in common with those from her culture and could speak the same language with them.

One girl described her experiences of growing up in a small town in a different state, where most of the residents are white. She didn’t think much of race at that point because everyone was the same and there wasn’t much up for discussion. One day, her older sister came home crying, saying she had been called a terrorist because of her religion. This experience in middle school made her more aware of how race affects her and others around her.

A few students who are biracial or have experiences with different backgrounds elaborated on how they often can’t figure out where they fit in. A main takeaway from this section is that with more diversity, there’s a greater range of people and you have to see where you fit on the spectrum, which can be hard sometimes.

Some students brought up how when their culture is talked about in class, other people who are not from that culture look at them with hopeful eyes, waiting for that student to explain more about their culture. These students pointed out that these situations can make them feel uncomfortable, and they specified that students who don’t know about that culture should differ to other resources, like the internet, instead of relying on that student for the facts.

To add on to learning about different cultures and races in classrooms, one girl mentioned how when learning about India, history classes typically teach negative aspects of that country. In this case, she said how India is depicted as a country where the only things that exist are the caste system and arranged marriages. This breaks her heart because she says she wants people to learn about the positive things about her country in class. Others could relate to her point.

As the discussion went on, students came to the agreement that exposure and comfort are different things. Being exposed to different races is different than being comfortable working together with those people. A girl explained this by describing her experience, where she said that it took her a really long time to understand the American accent, which made it difficult for her to be comfortable among students here after she moved from a different country.

So what about our school’s lack of diversity in staff? One teacher mentioned that studies show that students are more successful when they see people who look like them in an educational setting. Most students agreed that if there are similarities among the staff with students, it helps those students communicate better. Roundtable hopes to uncover more of this topic in the future.

The next topic of discussion shifted towards how race is viewed in the media. Multiple students mentioned how some races are often portrayed negatively in the media as compared to others. One student commented on how blaming the media isn’t necessarily the way to go. Encouraging these sources to show good news instead of bad news involving these races could help erase some negative stigmas about certain races about specific topics.

Society, however, works differently than media. Society is powered by the people themselves. One teacher focused on her relationship with her kids when it comes to talking about race. She emphasized that familial interactions are often key to developing more awareness about race in children.

Finally, one student mentioned how students who move here after middle school and ninth grade typically miss a lot of world history. This lack of historical knowledge can cause students to be misinformed or unaware of their actions.

What can be done to combat that? On a school level, teachers can add more perspectives into their teaching. One teacher pointed out that this is done in his class, as students read a variety of documents written by different people to show different perspectives felt during that time period. By incorporating practices such as these, students can learn more about the different experiences people have even if they never interacted with someone with that background before.

One important point to note is that you shouldn’t rely on the school system to teach you everything about races, cultures, and ethnic backgrounds. They can only teach so much, especially since there are specific rules regarding course requirements. Google is your friend, the library is your friend. Go visit them to help you out- you’ll probably learn something intriguing along the way!

This topic was inspired by Black History Month. If you would like to learn more about this, click here.

Additionally, one of Green Hope’s students, Kobe Davis, will be speaking at an event called “The Future of Black History” at the Cary Arts Center on February 23rd, from 12 – 4pm. More information in the photo. Free but RSVP is required.

A big thank you to everyone who attended this Roundtable. If you would like to come to the next one, it is during lunch on Wednesday, February 27th, in rooms 3302 & 3306. The next topic will be diet culture and body shaming.