There’s a New Score on the SAT: Adversity

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There’s a New Score on the SAT: Adversity

College Board adds a new score - the Adversity score

College Board adds a new score - the Adversity score

College Board adds a new score - the Adversity score

College Board adds a new score - the Adversity score

Gelila Petros, Staff Writer

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Last Thursday, College Board announced that students’ SAT scores will now include a new indicator along with the exam score. The Environmental Context Dashboard, or the adversity index, will measure factors such as crime rates, financial stability, and poverty in order to determine the socioeconomic disadvantages students may face.

The score will be out of 100 based on data from records such as the National Center for Education Statistics and the US Census. Scores under 50 would indicate more socioeconomic advantages and scores above 50 would indicate more hardships and socioeconomic disadvantages. The scores will not include race, but they will take into account things like student’s home and neighborhood environment, academic achievement, and their high school’s senior class size. The score will not become more important than GPA and SAT scores, but will provide additional information/context on the student. According to College Board, the score itself will not change or affect the actual SAT score.

For years, the SAT has been criticized due to the fact that, on average, wealthier students earn higher scores than middle class students and middle class students earn higher scores than lower income students. In addition, this year’s college admissions scandal revealed that wealthy families allegedly paid to fix their child’s SAT scores and even get them into a certain school. The new score has been piloted at 50 colleges and universities, from Florida State to Yale. College Board says the system will expand to approximately 150 colleges and universities later on in the year and will be available to all colleges by 2020.