Hi, @ghhsclassof2024

The+GHHS+Class+of+2024+Twitter+account+has+sparked+controversy+over+its+prejudiced+statements+
Back to Article
Back to Article

Hi, @ghhsclassof2024

The GHHS Class of 2024 Twitter account has sparked controversy over its prejudiced statements

The GHHS Class of 2024 Twitter account has sparked controversy over its prejudiced statements

The GHHS Class of 2024 Twitter account has sparked controversy over its prejudiced statements

The GHHS Class of 2024 Twitter account has sparked controversy over its prejudiced statements

Uma Bhat, Managing Editor

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






In previous years, the Green Hope name has always been attached to the championing of inclusivity and diversity. Youth activism has undoubtedly characterized Green Hope: home to organizations like MFOL Cary, T.E.A., and several affiliation clubs, the school has been known for its political voice on issues, just last year marching out to support victims of the MSD Shootings. Two days ago, however,  a newly-discovered mystery Twitter handle – @ghhsclassof2024, supposedly for next year’s rising freshmen – changed that, gaining notoriety for its provocative messages. 

“What Europeans did by replacing Native Americans is bad. Is it not equally as bad for Europeans to be replaced? There was never a vote on multiculturalism, the elites forced it on us,” one of the tweets reads, asserting a claim on how “multiculturalism” has impacted Europeans. Another states that “Blacks do 53% of the murder in the US.” 

The tweets were after just last month, when another volatile situation unfolded at nearby East Wake High (WCPSS – Wendell) — a racist group chat full of dangerously discriminatory texts were discovered by a student. The school was under siege during the entirety of the previous few weeks for their alleged “weakness” to combat racism. In a statement to the school, the principal claimed that the sort of behavior demonstrated by the participants of the group chat was “totally unacceptable” and that “conversations were needed” to address such incidents.  And just two weeks ago, a coach at Knightdale, who resigned after posting racist commentary in an Instagram video, wasn’t pressed any charges or arrested. All of these controversies are results of cyber-racism, or the proliferation of prejudiced rhetoric spreading through social media — despite WCPSS’s efforts to educate students about their online footprint as early as middle school.  

During the past few years, although WCPSS hasn’t necessarily been one hundred percent free of racism, there have been relatively few prominent cases of discriminatory behavior or continuously harmful stereotyping. Still, even with such cases that have perhaps caught the attention of those in close proximity of their schools, not many students are aware of such cases, nor is there a crack-down on policies combating racist sentiments — no matter whether it’s those of which are posted on the internet or those of which are more “face-to-face”. In fact, in a poll conducted last week by TheGHFalcon, 89% of a 112 member student sample from various Western Wake schools voted that they were not aware of the issues at East Wake HS at all.   

Now, the @ghhsclassof2024 account — the owner of which is unknown — has forced students into looking into the type of racism afflicting the community today, both online and offline. During the same survey, some responded that: “Many people will post incorrect information…it leads to the spread of misinformation which leads to disagreements.” According to Mr. Aymes, who teaches African American Studies at Green Hope, the sort of behavior put on display by the owner of the controversial twitter account is “surprising”. 

“I wish we had some sort of sociology class that could get taught to all the freshmen,” he explained. “We do have a sociology class, but you know it’s only people who are going to want to take that type of class who will be in it. There’s a very specific kind of person with a defined set of ideas that will take this class. At its core, we want to eliminate it [racism, prejudice] before it occurs and promote an inclusive community.” 

At its core, we want to eliminate it [racism, prejudice] before it occurs and promote an inclusive community”

— Mr. Aymes

For now, the @ghhsclassof2024 account holder still is unknown — but the messages, statements, and racist content they have spread among the student body is an issue that can only be addressed with a crackdown on policy enforcement by the county.