Why Are Our Clubs Disappearing?

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Clubs that students have worked hard to create seemed to be disappearing amidst the approval process. Why is this?

Lorelei Zagacki

The latest struggle for Green Hope students and administration deals with new and existing clubs.  As early as new student orientation, Green Hope students are encouraged to participate in various clubs that foster a sense of identity, purpose, and community.  Green Hope has always offered a vast number of clubs which provided students with a variety of choices and opportunities that may be of interest.  This year, however, many clubs seem to have been submitted to the chopping block.  Green Hope administration posted a list of approved clubs while many proposed clubs are ‘pending’ or ‘under review’.  Many student leaders of existing and new clubs are very anxious about the status of their club requests and fear disapproval.  Other clubs were forced to merge resulting in challenges to the officer roles and redefining the club mission, purpose and activities.

In an email to the “Food Ark Club”, which is a non-profit club founded in 2014, Assistant Principal Reagan states, “The issue is not gardening, it’s feeding people in need. That is where we have several clubs doing the same thing.”  While there may be other clubs engaging in similar outreach activities, should numerous Green Hope club organizations not be feeding as many people as we can?  Other students have said they have also received an email with similar wording, almost as a “copy and paste” email.

There have been other clubs that have not yet made the approved list.  For example, a new club “Girls Support Girls of Green Hope” club with forty interested members has been placed under review.  The “Girls Support Girls of Green Hope” club offers a safe place for girls to gather for conversation, friendship, and support.  Although there are other clubs for females such as “Future Women in Medicine” and “Women in Politics”, each club has a different purpose and mission statement.  It is worth noting that a “Young Men of Green Hope” club has been accepted.

Teacher sponsors and student leaders of clubs have worked hard to organize and promote their proposed clubs.   Many potential club members are left waiting and wondering why the club they are most interested in joining has yet to be approved.  Students worry whether they will have a limited selection of clubs to join that do not truly peak their interests.  During this Covid pandemic, when students desperately seek a sense of community and belonging more than ever, will the Green Hope administration start cutting back the much-needed opportunities for social engagement and student leadership?  Will clubs with a strong legacy now be disapproved?  Will Green Hope administration encourage or limit new ideas for social engagement and outreach? Only time will tell!